Work has been rough lately. There’s a lot of attention on my department and it really falls on my shoulders to perform.

Sometimes I’d really like to just be a cog.

D and I went back and forth today about my worries. Sometimes it’s hard to be married to a guy who is so easy going, who never worries about much.

I lamented about my concern about how the stress from my job may prevent us from getting pregnant.

He responded that I read too many Mommy blogs. (He probably isn’t wrong….)

I want to do well. I want to succeed. 

But breaking down into tears because I’m so worried isn’t professional or cool….

Sigh.

scinerds
s-c-i-guy:

Perihelion and Aphelion
The closest point to the Sun in a planet’s orbit is called perihelion. The furthest point is called aphelion. Notice how the planet moves fastest at perihelion and slowest at aphelion.
The time during the year that aphelion and perihelion (when we are closet to the sun) changes over a roughly 100,000 year cycle, known as the Milankovitch Cycle.  Our orbit around the sun is not a circle, it is an ellipse with an eccentricity of about 0.0167.  This orbit both changes shape and rotates around the sun much like a spirogram tracing out a flower-like shape.It is summer in the northern hemisphere, a time when people often say things like, “We are closer to the sun than we are in winter.”  This is not really true.  Summer is a product of the angle at which Earth is tilted, right now Earth is tilted so that the northern regions lean toward the sun.  In terms of orbit we are actually at the furthest point Earth gets from the sun.This has interesting implications in terms of the global climate.  This means that right now winters tend to be warm (the planet is closer to the sun) and summers cool (the planet further from the sun).  In the big picture this places us in the midst of a global cool cycle, the type of situation that tends to lead to ice ages, like the one we are emerging from.
source

s-c-i-guy:

Perihelion and Aphelion

The closest point to the Sun in a planet’s orbit is called perihelion. The furthest point is called aphelion. Notice how the planet moves fastest at perihelion and slowest at aphelion.

The time during the year that aphelion and perihelion (when we are closet to the sun) changes over a roughly 100,000 year cycle, known as the Milankovitch Cycle.  Our orbit around the sun is not a circle, it is an ellipse with an eccentricity of about 0.0167.  This orbit both changes shape and rotates around the sun much like a spirogram tracing out a flower-like shape.

It is summer in the northern hemisphere, a time when people often say things like, “We are closer to the sun than we are in winter.”  This is not really true.  Summer is a product of the angle at which Earth is tilted, right now Earth is tilted so that the northern regions lean toward the sun.  In terms of orbit we are actually at the furthest point Earth gets from the sun.

This has interesting implications in terms of the global climate.  This means that right now winters tend to be warm (the planet is closer to the sun) and summers cool (the planet further from the sun).  In the big picture this places us in the midst of a global cool cycle, the type of situation that tends to lead to ice ages, like the one we are emerging from.

source

Hair/Cancer/Normal

One of my coworkers burst into the break room at lunch today and upon seeing me eating my lunch, exclaimed:

"What made you do it?!"

She was referring to my haircut. Her tone implied that I had gone off the deep-end, had some sort of existential crisis, left my husband, or had an unfortunate accident with a very large wad of chewing gum that resulted in my extreme hair cut.

It was none of these things.

A bit of background: I generally keep my hair well below my shoulders for one specific reason: to donate.

As a cancer survivor, it would be what I would have wanted if I had lost my hair due to treatment. Especially if I was younger. Actually, I’m not sure what I would have done if I had lost my hair to treatment in high school. My hair was long enough to sit on then, and I would have wanted some of my own hair made into a wig, I think, but I can’t be sure. I may have braved it bald…. But probably not.

So today when my coworker approached the question with the tone she used, I became a bit defensive, and my response probably took a tone that I didn’t want it to, but….

She made it sound as though the 10 inches I cut off my hair was an ill-advised emotional choice instead of the very calculated and planned 2 years of preparation to grow.

This is a nod of solidarity to those who weren’t as lucky as I was during my treatment. It’s a gift of normalcy in a time when your life is in chaos, people treat you differently, your life is different and all you want is to be treated the same as everyone else.

A big thing that I think a lot of people don’t realize about cancer is that even though you’re sick, you still want to be treated the same (within the available physical possibilities) because the “Cancer Perks” just make you feel… coddled.

I remember having this fight with my dad at the dinner table. I was 17, freshly diagnosed, and I don’t even know what we were arguing about. But he said this:

"But you’re sick!"

And I yelled back, “I am, but it hasn’t changed who I am!”

Which is probably exactly what any 17 year old would say, considering 17 year olds…..

But I also remember they would let me disappear.

I’d drive an hour or two away to visit my friends without asking, or sit alone on the beach for hours without telling them where I was. That was the biggest Cancer Perk my parents gave me - a very long leash with which to cope with my disease.

Which, was nice, but at the same time, was special treatment I didn’t necessarily want just because I was sick, but because they trusted me.

This has gone a bit off the rail, and I’m on a tangent, but normal is important when you deal with illness.

I’ve seen those FB posts about how a cancer patient only wants one thing: to beat cancer. And sure, that’s absolutely true, but I feel that more than that, I didn’t want to become my disease to everyone, and I just wanted to be treated normally.

So, this is my small gift of normal to other Cancer Kids….

This morning, in my haste to take a pregnancy test, I accidentally used an ovulation test.

They look exactly the same and I had to pee. It was also early and I got little sleep.

Sigh.

Good thing they’re cheap. Dollar Store FTW.

Also: BFN.

My period should start in a couple days. Having a 24 day cycle is ridiculous.

I’m disappointed. I know it’s silly and naive to thing we’d get pregnant our first month out, but it’s been drilled into our heads how easily we get pregnant in our families. Fertile stock.

I had sharp pain yesterday, I hoped it was implantation. Probably not.

So. Yeah.

ladiesagainsthumanity
ladiesagainsthumanity:

Meet the Douchebros of the Week: Michigan House members Ben Glardon, Peter Pettalia, and Roger Victory. These three charming specimens of worthless white dudes came to my attention via this tweet: 

"@MIHouseGOP members Victory, Pettalia, and Glardon: ‘Don’t say we don’t understand women.’ #mileg"
Aside from the notion of “lol we read women’s magazines hilars” being monumentally insulting, these three have also voted for such disgusting legislation as the Abortion Insurance Opt-Out Act, the bill which forces women on Obamacare to buy separate insurance to cover abortions in case of rape. Seriously. That is a thing. That is now law. Because they voted for it.
Here’s the good news: it’s an election year in Michigan, and we can get these jerks out of office. All three are in competitive races, and they’re all being challenged by women.
Click here to contribute to MI List, which funds pro-choice women candidates in Michigan.
I should also mention two particularly wonderful candidates for the Michigan House, my friends Jon Hoadley and Rebecca Thompson. They are both amazing, inspiring people, and it would give me great pleasure to watch them lay the smack down on these fools during the next session of the Michigan legislature. Please consider contributing to their campaigns as well. 
Thanks and smooches! xx, ksl

ladiesagainsthumanity:

Meet the Douchebros of the Week: Michigan House members Ben Glardon, Peter Pettalia, and Roger Victory. These three charming specimens of worthless white dudes came to my attention via this tweet

"@MIHouseGOP members Victory, Pettalia, and Glardon: ‘Don’t say we don’t understand women.’ #mileg"

Aside from the notion of “lol we read women’s magazines hilars” being monumentally insulting, these three have also voted for such disgusting legislation as the Abortion Insurance Opt-Out Act, the bill which forces women on Obamacare to buy separate insurance to cover abortions in case of rape. Seriously. That is a thing. That is now law. Because they voted for it.

Here’s the good news: it’s an election year in Michigan, and we can get these jerks out of office. All three are in competitive races, and they’re all being challenged by women.

Click here to contribute to MI List, which funds pro-choice women candidates in Michigan.

I should also mention two particularly wonderful candidates for the Michigan House, my friends Jon Hoadley and Rebecca Thompson. They are both amazing, inspiring people, and it would give me great pleasure to watch them lay the smack down on these fools during the next session of the Michigan legislature. Please consider contributing to their campaigns as well. 

Thanks and smooches! xx, ksl